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Whats up my Negus?

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Whats up my Negus?

Derrick Banks

1 of 1 Cashmere Negus Shirt

1 of 1 Cashmere Negus Shirt

Greetings good people today, I wanted to drop some knowledge on something that you probably noticed at the shop. Some of you have asked about it, and some of you well, maybe were too bashful to ask. And others probably understood it as soon as you saw it. What is this "it" I am talking about? Well it's the N-word. Today I want to give a breakdown of the N-word its usage and the reasons black people still might use it today. 

Author D.Banks wearing Neither T-Shirt

Author D.Banks wearing Neither T-Shirt

First the history of the word N----r. Whew doesn't it look crazy even seeing it written? Let us take a look at the words latin origin. Necro - meaning black object, something that is not alive from this comes words in english like necromancer necrophilia etc. Nekro in Greek basically denotes the same meaning as it's latin cousin; black object, usually associated with death. Then you have the language Spanish which is basically Latin's younger brother.  In Spanish we have the word negro pronounced neh-groh this time it is the actual color black and it is sometimes used to describe people for example negro + poqito = negrito which means little black person.   We know from Columbus and other history that Spain played a major roll in the slave trade so it's no wonder the darkskinned people were described as Negros.  

English and America. First of all let me say that in different parts of America people have different accents. In the case of the N-word, people in the south don't pronounce ER the way people in the north do.  Let's look at a few examples. Door becomes Doh, Four becomes Foh, whore becomes Ho. Well you get the point.  In the North it was Nigger in the south it was Nigga. So the word Nigga is not a term of endearment created by black people in hip-hop 100years later. It's just the same crap in a different toilet.

Kebra Negus

Kebra Negus

And finally the word NEGUS -  Negus comes for a language called Ge'ez which later gave birth to Amharic which is the second most spoken language in the Middle East. Negus means sovereign ruler and was a title given to the King of Ethiopia. And more recently it was used to denote a type of accomplishment similar to Knighthood in England.

Different groups have advocated a banning of the N-word and started campaigns against it. I personally don't use the word but I don't condemn or judge those that do. It is very difficult to break bad habits, especially those that don't seem to be so harmful. As human beings instead of changing what is wrong, we just find an excuse to exhibit the same behavior. The brain is clever that way.  For those of you that do use the word I hope that this blog post has been insightful and educational. That way you don't have to quote some Tupac song or Kendrick Lamaar interlude to know the truth behind the matter.  You can give a more educated answer as to why you do or do not use the word. At the end of the day I believe words are very, very, powerful so be careful how you choose to use them.

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update: someone thought I made this all up and was talking out the side of my neck so now I have to provide sources to shed some light on the subject. 

sources: http://www.naimakbar.com/documents/The_Creation_of_the_Negro.pdf 

definition of the word negus:

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/negus 

Spain's connection to slavery :

http://discoveringbristol.org.uk/slavery/routes/places-involved/south-america/Spain-slavery-contract/ 

and how about the relationship between latin and spanish:

http://linguistics.byu.edu/classes/ling450ch/reports/spanish.html